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  • Anthony Martinez is 84-years-old and suffering from renal failure, as well as other serious medical conditions including dementia. He is currently incarcerated in the Sterling Correctional Facility, site of one of Colorado’s largest COVID-19 outbreaks with almost 600 active COVID-19 cases. He and his family are understandably terrified that he will catch the virus and die.

    In the midst of this public health crisis, incarcerated people as vulnerable as Anthony, could and should be immediately released to safely live out their remaining years with family.

    Read more about Anthony Martinez and other at-risk incarcerated people. 

  • Ronald Johnson is pre-diabetic, suffers from asthma and high blood pressure, and regularly uses an inhaler to breathe. His age and respiratory ailments put him at risk of serious illness and death if he contracts COVID-19. With over hundreds of active cases in Colorado’s prisons, his family fears he will not make it out alive. His daughter, Amber, says, “In prison, he can’t protect himself and he can’t social distance. My deep fear is that my dad will die in prison. That is an awful, traumatic reality to consider. My chest is tight just thinking about how quickly it spreads and how vulnerable he is.”

    Governor Hickenlooper shortened his sentence following testimony from family, friends and correctional officers advocating for his early release. Yet, he is still eight years away from parole. While he remains in prison, COVID-19 continues to spread. Ronald’s three siblings, four children and four grandchildren are desperate for his release.

    Read more about Ronald Johnson and other at-risk incarcerated people.

  • Tuesday Olson knew her pregnancy was in trouble and tried to access hospital care as soon as possible. But there was a problem: she was in jail. This is her story.
  • It’s time to end the death penalty in Colorado. Family members who lost loved ones to murder speak out against an unjust and broken system.

ACLU ATTORNEYS FILE SUIT IN DEFENSE OF ENGLEWOOD SHOP OWNER’S MURAL

July 16, 2007

Citing constitutional protections of expression, the ACLU of Colorado announced today that its attorneys will to go court to defend Mike Mahaney, an Englewood shop owner whose mural depicting an Alice in Wonderland scene has prompted controversy and citations for allegedly violating the City’s sign code.

“These murals are artistic expression that is protected by the First Amendment and the Colorado Constitution,” said Mark Silverstein, ACLU Legal Director. “After reviewing the Englewood sign ordinance, we do not believe that it can constitutionally be applied to punish our client in this case. ACLU volunteer attorneys entered their appearance in Englewood Municipal Court this morning, and they will be filing a motion to dismiss the charges on constitutional grounds.”

Mahaney sells pipes and smoking accessories in his shop, Headed West. He painted murals on two side of his store in an effort to deter graffiti vandalism. A mural featuring images of Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and other musicians went up first. The Alice in Wonderland scene, depicting a hookah-smoking caterpillar and a white rabbit with a pill on its tongue, went up later. The City soon received complaints that the mural sent an “inappropriate” message regarding drug use. Although Mahaney painted over the pill, City officials were not satisfied. Mahaney was cited for three violations of the sign code, including failing to request a permit.

The controversy over Mahaney’s murals was a subject of discussion at the Englewood City Council in May, where several dozen persons attended in support of the murals. Mahaney brought a petition with 600 signatures urging the City to let the murals stay. The number of signatures has now grown to 1000, Mahaney said.

ACLU volunteer cooperating attorneys Tom Macdonald and James Johnson will represent Mahaney in Englewood Municipal Court.



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