Colorado Rights Blog

October 20th, 2014

2014 Annual Report

ACLU of Colorado By: ACLU of Colorado Our 2013-2014 Annual Report is here! Read about the past year's legislative victories, legal team achievements, community engagement efforts, and the people who inspire us and make our work possible: [caption id="attachment_4267" align="aligncenter" width="231"] ACLU of Colorado 2013-2014 Annual Report[/caption] | Read More

October 20th, 2014

A wonderful evening at the Carle Whitehead Bill of Rights Dinner

ACLU of Colorado By: ACLU of Colorado Last Friday, October 17, the ACLU of Colorado held its annual Carle Whitehead Bill of Rights Dinner at the Four Seasons Hotel in Denver. Attended by close to 300 supporters, the dinner featured award presentations to outstanding civil rights and civil liberties leaders and featured speaker Dennis Parker, national ACLU Racial Justice Program Director. Congratulations to honorees Bob Connelly, Laura Rovner, and the late Dr. Vincent Harding. And thank you to our wonderful sponsors, supporters, and.... | Read More

October 20th, 2014

Durango Herald Op-Ed: Practice is ineffective, costly, barbaric and mistake-ridden

ACLU of Colorado By: ACLU of Colorado This op-ed, written by our Executive Director, appeared in Saturday's Durango Herald: The death penalty is a broken, costly and barbaric practice that does nothing to deter crime or enhance justice. All too often, it brings about the ultimate injustice: government execution of an innocent person. Application of the death penalty is highly arbitrary and often biased, depending upon location, money, race, mental illness, the personal judgment of a district attorney and quality of legal representation..... | Read More

October 16th, 2014

Democracy in Action

ACLU of Colorado By: ACLU of Colorado (From The Human Race and Other Sports) By Christopher Brauchli, Human Race & Other Sports As long as I count the votes, what are you going to do about it? — William Marcy Tweed, November 1871. Recent events cause some to wonder whether the literacy tests that voters in some states were required to pass, before voting, from the early 1890s until the 1960s, are preferable to the methods used today to disenfranchise minority voters. Literacy tests were used so that those who were elected.... | Read More

October 3rd, 2014

JeffCo Students Give an Impressive Lesson in Patriotism. Too Bad their School Board wasn’t Listening

ACLU of Colorado By: ACLU of Colorado How disappointing that a majority of the Jefferson County School Board chose last night to disregard student protests and pass a curriculum review proposal designed to identify "objectionable materials" in high school curricula, starting with U.S. history, presumably to remove those materials if they do not meet the ideological criteria of the school board members. Despite apparent changes to make the proposal seem less inflammatory, there is no reason to trust it. The Jeffco School Board members.... | Read More

September 22nd, 2014

Fighting for Captain Underpants

ACLU Blog of Rights By: ACLU Blog of Rights (From the ACLU Blog of Rights) By Samia Hossain, William J. Brennan Fellow, ACLU Speech, Privacy, & Technology Project   "Captain Underpants and the Perilous Plot of Professor Poopypants." "Captain Underpants and the Wrath of the Wicked Wedgie Woman." "Captain Underpants and the Farty Fight for Free Speech." Okay fine, I made up the last one. The silly titles of the "Captain Underpants" series lined our bookshelf at home, thanks to my younger brother. As his wiser and worldlier.... | Read More

Tweets

Videos

  • On November 21, 2016, 13 Aurora police officers responded to a simple noise complaint at Alberto Torres’s home. As happens all too often, Aurora police officers escalated this minor issue into a brutal affair. They beat Mr. Torres solely because he delayed exiting his garage to ask his wife to interpret for him. With that beating, the lives of Mr. Torres and every member of his family were changed and he has yet to recover. ACLU of Colorado fought to obtain justice for Mr. Torres, and Aurora has now paid him $285,000. But money is not justice, and the brutality of the Aurora Police Department against people of color has continued unabated.

    It doesn’t have to be this way.

    Imagine, if instead of 13 officers being dispatched to Mr. Torres’s home for a noise complaint, the City of Aurora sent a civilian-led response team to check on his welfare and ask that he and his friends lower their sound, resulting in a non-violent solution to a minor issue?

    ACLU Settles Case With Aurora After Police Brutalize and Unlawfully Arrest Alberto Torres

  • Hope is a discipline. It’s a commitment that together, we can create a more perfect union. We won’t rest until we fulfill the promise of equal rights for ALL people in the United States.

    Join us in our fight to fulfill this promise and move forward with hope by donating to the ACLU of Colorado. Your donation supports the ACLU’s strengths that make our work effective and collaborative.

    Donate now at https://action.aclu.org/give/support-aclu-colorado

  • Anthony Martinez is 84-years-old and suffering from renal failure, as well as other serious medical conditions including dementia. He is currently incarcerated in the Sterling Correctional Facility, site of one of Colorado’s largest COVID-19 outbreaks with almost 600 active COVID-19 cases. He and his family are understandably terrified that he will catch the virus and die.

    In the midst of this public health crisis, incarcerated people as vulnerable as Anthony, could and should be immediately released to safely live out their remaining years with family.

    Read more about Anthony Martinez and other at-risk incarcerated people. 

  • Ronald Johnson is pre-diabetic, suffers from asthma and high blood pressure, and regularly uses an inhaler to breathe. His age and respiratory ailments put him at risk of serious illness and death if he contracts COVID-19. With over hundreds of active cases in Colorado’s prisons, his family fears he will not make it out alive. His daughter, Amber, says, “In prison, he can’t protect himself and he can’t social distance. My deep fear is that my dad will die in prison. That is an awful, traumatic reality to consider. My chest is tight just thinking about how quickly it spreads and how vulnerable he is.”

    Governor Hickenlooper shortened his sentence following testimony from family, friends and correctional officers advocating for his early release. Yet, he is still eight years away from parole. While he remains in prison, COVID-19 continues to spread. Ronald’s three siblings, four children and four grandchildren are desperate for his release.

    Read more about Ronald Johnson and other at-risk incarcerated people.